PAST EVENTS


Kate O. SessionsTalk
KATE O. SESSIONS: A NETWORK AND LEGACY OF BOTANICAL BOUNTY
March 19, 2017 • 2:00pm
The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens
Pasadena, California

At the turn of the twentieth century, Kate Sessions was a renowned San Diego-based pioneer in plant importation and experimentation. Nicknamed “the Mother of Balboa Park,” Sessions introduced and popularized many of the region’s beloved tree species.  Nancy Carol Carter, landscape historian and author, examines Sessions’ indelible mark on the landscape of Southern California and her iconic Arts & Crafts garden style.  Presented in collaboration with the California Garden and Landscape History Society.


batchelderTour & Talk
Ernest Batchelder: His Public Legacy, His Private Garden
January 29, 2017 • Pasadena, California

Ernest A. Batchelder was an author, designer, educator, artist, and tilemaker who settled in Pasadena in the early 20th century. His tiles can be seen in Arts and Crafts era houses and gardens all over Southern California.

The day will included:
· A visit to the Pasadena Museum of History’s exhibit, “Batchelder: Filemaker,” with the exhibit’s curator, Laura Verlaque

· Lunch in the garden of the Batchelder House as guests of Professor Robert Winter

· A visit to the historic Pasadena Playhouse, where we will see a Batchelder fountain in the courtyard, and the Batchelder fireplace in the Playhouse Library, a room usually closed to the public.

Photo: Batchelder fountain at Plaza de las Fuentes, Pasadena, CA. Photograph by Kelly Comras


Bidwell ParkConference
CHICO, JEWEL OF THE NORTH VALLEY
September 23-25, 2016 • Chico, California

Chico, Annie and John Bidwell’s gift-that-keeps-surprising to California. Explore the campus, the park, and the preserves of this lively, and very contemporary, center of ranchers, students, and artists. (Named by the Rough Guide to California [2014], as the only town in the Sacramento Valley worth visiting.)

 

 


PalosVerdesTalkTour2016Tour & Talk
ARCHITECTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL WALKING TOUR OF THE VILLAGE OF MALAGA COVE IN PALOS VERDES ESTATES
June 5, 2016 • 10:30am-2:30pm
Palos Verdes Estates, California

Led by Christy Edstrom O’Hara, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

The evolution of the Palos Verdes Peninsula extends over 100 years and continues today. Palos Verdes was conceived as a totally planned community. Its meticulous design was developed by the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm as Directors of Design, along with city planner Charles “Harry” Cheney, and architect Myron Hunt. Eventually known as the Palos Verdes Ranch Project, the suburban community was designed during a critical period of regionalism, in which the creators sought to express American design values that were distinctively Californian. This Tour & Talk will include discussion of community design development from 1914 – 1930. The village center, Malaga Cove, was the only village built per the original 1920s plans. Laid out like an Italian hill town, our walk will begin at the central plaza and extend from the high point of Farnham Martin Park to the beach at the end of the tour. We will have a picnic lunch in the park; the adjacent Myron Hunt-designed library offers period interiors for our review.


Carolyn BennettLecture
SAVING OUR GARDENS…HONORING OUR PAST
Monday, November 2, 2015 • 7:30pm
The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

California Garden & Landscape History Society is proud to partner with The Huntington in presenting a lecture by CGLHS director-at-large Carolyn Bennett.

A landscape designer and historian, Carolyn Bennett offers an insightful overview of the historic garden preservation movement. Filled with provocative reflections on the values and management of some of civilization’s most cherished green spaces, this talk will delight novice garden lovers, landscape professionals, and everyone in between!


Panam-Cal-Expos-POSTCARD-605pxConference
CULTIVATING IDENTITY: BALBOA PARK AS CULTURAL LANDSCAPE
October 2-4, 2015
San Diego, California

the centennial celebration of the 1915 Panama-California Exposition at our annual conference in San Diego’s Balboa Park. Known as “the Garden Fair,” the 1915 Exposition unleashed a century of  influence over California architecture and landscapes.


cornell-wotwTour & Talk
WHAT’S OUT THERE WEEKEND LOS ANGELES: THE PUBLIC LANDSCAPES OF RALPH D. CORNELL
November 7-9 2014
Los Angeles, California

CGLHS and UCLA Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA were proud to co-sponsor this event with The Cultural Landscape Foundation

This What’s Out There Weekend focuses on the built legacy of Los Angeles-based landscape architect Ralph D. Cornell (1890-1972), who studied at Pomona College and Harvard University, and opened one of the city’s first landscape architecture practices in 1919. Cornell’s prolific career spanned the Beaux Arts and Modernist periods and includes such iconic landscapes as Beverly Gardens Park, Hillside Memorial Park, downtown LA’s Civic Center, the restoration of the historic grounds at the National Historic Landmark-designated Rancho Los Cerritos, and numerous places on the UCLA campus.

Image: Watercolor of Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve by Ralph D. Cornell, undated. Ralph D. Cornell Papers. Department Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA.


lockwood-de-forest-conference-2014Conference
THE LANDSCAPE LEGACY OF
LOCKWOOD DE FOREST

October 24-26, 2014
Santa Barbara, California

A celebration of Lockwood de Forest Jr. (1896-1949), an innovative and influential landscape architect, and
his remarkable family—his wife and partner, Elizabeth Kellam de Forest (1898-1984), and his father, Lockwood de Forest II (1850-1932), a masterful landscape painter and decorator.

Image: Courtesy of Kellam de Forest


shinn gardensConference
BECOMING PUBLIC: DESIGN, HISTORY, PLANTS AND PRESERVATION IN EAST BAY GARDENS
September 28-29, 2013
Pleasanton, California

This year we explored the warm hills of the eastern San Francisco Bay Area by visiting three now-public gardens (Dry Creek Garden – Hayward, Shinn Historic Park and Arboretum – Fremont, and Ruth Bancroft Garden – Walnut Creek) well adapted to their terrain and climate. All were developed by passionate garden-lovers between the 1880s and 1970s and are currently managed and maintained by cities, non-profit organizations and volunteers.

Image: Shinn Orchard by S. Raube


Tour
WHEN THEY WERE WILD
wildflowers
May 31, 2013
Huntington Library and Gardens

“Recapturing California’s Wildflower Heritage” – Huntington exhibit which drew attention to the rich heritage of wildflower illustration and took a closer look at California’s natural and horticultural history.

“When They Were Wild: Recapturing California’s Wildflower Heritage,” showcased more than 300 items—drawings, paintings, herbarium specimens, photographs, and other objects—that trace the journey of California’s plants from the flower fields into the home garden.

The exhibition was a collaborative project of The Huntington, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, Calif., and the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants in Sun Valley, Calif. Works from all three collections, along with loans from several other public and private collections, were on view in the Huntington show, with related displays at the two other institutions and at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden.

Image: “When They Were Wild” exhibition, Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, CA, May, 2013. Photo: Carolyn Bennett


Tour & Talk
A FRESNO FROLIC
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture
April 12-14, 2013
Fresno, California

This spring escape with us for a trip to one of our state’s least known treasures, the historic city of Fresno, founded in 1872. The California Garden and Landscape History Society invites you to join us in this Central Valley city, located about halfway between San Francisco and Los Angeles.

You will have the opportunity to explore California’s fifth largest city – its venerable residential neighborhoods, French-inspired gardens, and the extraordinary Clark Center of Japanese Art and Culture. Walk with us under a tunnel of century-old olives, and tour the Forestiere Underground Garden, the handiwork and summer retreat of the eccentric Baldassare Forestiere, who worked on the garden for 40 years.

Image: Japanese gate with apartment, garage and poppies, Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, April, 2012. Photo: Sonya Simonis


piecingTour & Talk
PIECING TOGETHER PASADENA’S GARDEN HISTORY:
A Unique Project in an American City

October 13, 2012 10:00am-2:00pm
Pasadena, California

Kevin Johnson, planner in the City of Pasadena’s Design and Historic Preservation section, will speak at La Casita del Arroyo on a remarkable project, the Study of Historic Designed Gardens in Pasadena, thought to be the only survey of its kind in the country.

For more on the project click here.

Pasadena’s rich garden history spans the work of great American landscape architects from the Olmsted Brothers to Lawrence Halprin.

Image: Pasadena’s Historic Designed Gardens project has turned up a number interesting gardens. Credit: Kevin Johnson, City of Pasadena


western-hills-garden-by-sandra-price

Conference
PLANTS, PASSION, AND PROPAGATION: A HORTICULTURAL TOUR OF SONOMA COUNTY
September 8-9, 2012
San Rosa, California

A celebration of the horticultural heritage of Sonoma County — “the chosen spot,” as Luther Burbank wrote in 1875, “of all this earth as far as Nature is concerned.” We second that. For more than a century, Sonoma County has brought forth a rich diversity of plant material that has found its way into the gardens of the state, country, and the world.

Image: Western Hills Garden by Sandra Price


Conference
Ranchos-CastlesRANCHOS TO CASTLES: A TOUR OF SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY
September 9-10-11, 2011
San Luis Obispo, California

Our 2011 conference celebrated the wonderful variety of SLO County’s contrasting sites—from 19th-century Californio ranchos to the Hearst Castle to a local winery and its vineyards. This still semi-rural landscape has a long history of compelling landscape development, beginning in 1772, when Padre Junipero Serra founded Mission San Luís Obispo de Tolosa—the fifth established in Alta California by the Franciscan Order.

Image: Mission Plaza by J. Williams


Ferrand GardenTour & Talk
KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES: BEATRIX FARRAND’S SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GARDENS
Tour – Saturday, November 13, 2010
Talk – Sunday, November 14, 2010

Beatrix Jones Farrand was born into one of the wealthiest families of old New York – and the “keeping up with the . . .” reportedly refers to her family! This niece of Edith Wharton took up landscape design in her early twenties, confounding what was expected of such a grand young woman in the 1890s.

In 1927, her husband historian Max Farrand was appointed director of the Huntington Library – and Southern California would be blessed with Beatrix Farrand gardens: the director’s house at the Huntington; the courtyard of Dabney Hall at Caltech; parts of Occidental College; and the Santa Barbara Botanical Garden among them. On Saturday’s tour we will explore the remnants of a few of her gardens.

On Sunday, November 14 at 2 p.m. garden historian Judith Tankard will discuss her latest book, Beatrix Farrand: Private Gardens, Public Landscapes at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Image: Max and Beatrix Farrand in their garden at the Director’s House, Huntington Library, late 1930s. Photo courtesy of the Bar Harbor Historical Society


Conference
Bockius-Orr House-rightSANTA CRUZ: LAND OF 1001 WONDERS
October 15-17, 2010
Santa Cruz County, California

We celebrated our 15th anniversary at the place where our organization began. The theme of the conference was focus on the region’s extraordinary natural and cultural landscape, drawing attention to the importance of the living collections at the University of California, Santa Cruz Arboretum, and honoring our founder, Bill Grant. Marlea Graham, founding editor of our journal, Eden, and Phoebe Cutler were the conveners.

Image: Bockius-Orr House and front garden. Courtesy Pajaro Valley Historical Association


Rancho Los AlamitosTour & Talk
NATURE OF THE PLACE

Saturday, October 2, 2010
Rancho Los Alamitos Historic Ranch and Gardens,
Long Beach, Calif.

The remarkable historic landscape of Rancho Los Alamitos will unfold before your eyes as we tour its four acres of gardens, designed by some of the most significant landscape designers of the early-to-mid 20th Century, and its early 19th Century adobe ranch house and barns.

Rancho Los Alamitos Director Pamela Seager will illuminate for us this property’s successful road to preservation.

Image: Rancho Los Alamitos


Will Rogers State Historic ParkTours & Talks
NEVER MET A VIEW I DIDN’T LIKE
Sunday, July 11, 2010
Will Rogers State Historic Park,
Pacific Palisades, Calif.

He was charming, brilliant, and in the 1930s the most popular (and highest paid) actor in Hollywood.

Will Rogers was, also, a far-reaching thinker about the peerless California landscape. His 186 acres overlooking the Pacific in what became Pacific Palisades includes an elegant ranch house of 31 rooms, a stable, riding ring, roping arena, polo field, golf course and a network of hiking trails.

Join us as we tour this magnificent property and learn about recent preservation efforts.

Image: Will Rogers State Park


King Gillette RanchTour & Talk
ON THE RAZOR’S EDGE
Saturday, May 22, 2010
The King Gillette Ranch, Calabasas, Calif.

Our grandfathers knew one of the wealthiest men in America rather intimately – every time they opened a packet of disposable razor blades, there he was, on the wrapper. And his name was really King. In 1926, he bought the 360-acre Stokes Ranch in the heart of the Malibu Creek Watershed. Gillette built several homes here, most notably the 1928-1929 Wallace Neff designed Spanish Colonial Revival house, Neff’s masterpiece of the pre-War era.

But Gillette was only one owner to make his mark on the landscape. Please join us as a cultural anthropologist from the National Park Service gives us a behind-the-scenes tour of the recently-acquired King Gillette Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains.

One of the most stunning locales in the Santa Monica Mountains, the biologically diverse parkland contains broad meadows and low ridgelines, valley and coast live oak savannah, grassland, coastal sage scrub, chaparral, and riparian woodland.

Image: King Gillette Ranch


ScrippsCollegeTour & Talk
LANDSCAPE AS SANCTUARY

Saturday, April 17, 2010
The Elegant Campus of Scripps College,
Claremont, Calif.

Join us as Eric T. Haskell, professor of French Studies and Humanities at Scripps College and director of the Clark Humanities Museum, speaks on “Scripps’ Lasting Landscapes and the Getty’s Campus Heritage Initiative.”

In 1926 when the Scripps College was on the drawing boards, architect Gordon Kaufmann and landscape architect Edward Huntsman-Trout, inspired by the vision of Ellen Browning Scripps, sought to create a unique environment for learning. Their dynamic collaboration produced an academic Eden whose scale was residential and whose hallmark was elegant simplicity. The unity between buildings and grounds was stressed, and their shared aesthetic vocabulary was from the outset intended to speak the same language. Miss Scripps words capture the essence of this unique vision of uncommon aesthetic power: “I am thinking of a college campus whose simplicity and beauty will unobtrusively seep into a student’s consciousness and quietly develop a standard of taste and judgment.”

Scripps College is a repository of 1930s architectural and landscape elegance. For example, its grand allée of American elms, designed in the early 1930s and planted in 1939, has framed college graduations since 1947.

Selected for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places in 1984, Scripps College received a Getty Campus Heritage Initiative Grant in 2002.

Image: Scripps College, Claremont, CA.


Levi Strauss PlazaConference
LANDSCAPES FOR LIVING: THE POST WAR YEARS IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
October 23-25, 2009
San Francisco Bay Area, California
A symposium co-sponsored by The Cultural Landscape Foundation, held in conjunction with our annual meeting.

Landscapes for Living will place a focus on the unique Post War legacy of public and private landscapes in Northern California through actual participants who played an active role during what is now thought to be an unprecedented, optimistic time of innovation and experimentation. Speakers will provide rare insights and will include critical participants of the era in addition to present-day practitioners and historians.

Image: Levi Strauss Plaza, San Francisco


lone-pine-californiaConference
SPIRIT OF LANDSCAPE: CALIFORNIA’S LOWER OWENS RIVER VALLEY
September 26-28, 2008

Lone Pine, California
The 2008 Annual Conference of the California Garden & Landscape History Society will celebrate the beauty and diversity of California’s Eastern Sierra region landscape.  Through talks and tours, we will explore art forms inspired by this dramatic mountain, desert, and river valley landscape. The conference will focus on the literature of Mary Austin (among the first to realize that landscapes don’t have to be green to be beautiful), western films, local native plant gardens, and gardens created by Japanese Americans who were interned at Manzanar during World War II.  We will also learn about significant changes wrought on the land both by the diversion of water from the Owens River into Los Angeles aqueducts, and by the current re-watering of the Lower Owens River.

Image: Lone Pine, California


Storrier-Stearns Japanese GardenConference
CALIFORNIA JAPANESE STYLE GARDENS: TRADITION AND PRACTICE
September 28-30, 2007
National Center for the Preservation of Democracy
Los Angeles, California
Exotic portions of great estates, commercial teahouse gardens, modest bungalow gardens, and public sister city or friendship gardens—for more than a century the lure of Japan has inspired a category of gardens that will be the subject of the California Garden and Landscape History Society’s conference and annual meeting.  Through talks, an exhibition visit, and garden tours, the conference will focus not only on the Japanese-style garden in California but on the Japanese Americans who designed, constructed, and maintained them.

Image: Storrier-Stearns Japanese Garden, Pasadena, CA


Hakone-Gardens-conferenceConference
CALIFORNIA’S SARATOGA: SPRINGS, ORCHARDS & GARDENS
October 20-22, 2006
Old Fireman’s Social Hall
Saratoga, California
Fifty miles south of San Francisco, surrounded by orchards and the dramatic Santa Cruz Mountains, the Saratoga-Los Gatos area has attracted vacationers since just after the Civil War. We will hear from experts and visit four important gardens–survivors of this early California resort era.

Our conference begins in Los Gatos (a 19th century rail head for arriving guests) with a Friday evening reception at the Museum of Art, housed in a converted fire house set amidst summer bungalows. On Saturday and Sunday from our base in Saratoga, we will examine the landscape history and the gardens of the Santa Clara Valley’s west side. The village of Saratoga is a designated California Historical Site with interesting architecture, and the hills which surround it are full of vineyards producing first-rate California wines. Once called “Tollgate,” it was named “Saratoga” in 1865 for its healthful spring waters (a reference to Congress Springs in Saratoga, New York), and the region’s orchards were celebrated by the artist Theodore Wores (1859-1939) whose studio-gallery was located in the former Methodist-Episcopal Church.

Image: Hakone Gardens, Saratoga, California


cglhs-napaConference
BEYOND VINEYARDS: LANDSCAPES OF THE NAPA VALLEY
June 11-12, 2005
St. Helena School Auditorium
St. Helena, California

This conference will give participants a perspective of the Napa Valley, past and present, plus an intimate look at the landscape usually reserved for locals. There will be lectures to provide historic context, tours of six private gardens located throughout the valley, a reception at the historic Spottswoode estate, and a wine tasting.


Conference
THE EMPIRE THAT CITRUS BUILT: LANDSCAPE HISTORY OF OLD SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY

November 5-7, 2004
Riverside Municipal Museum
Riverside, California


cglhs-conference-2005Conference
EARTHLY PARADISE: GARDEN HISTORY OF THE SAN FRANCISCO PENINSULA
July 25-27, 2003
Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University
Palo Alto, California

Image: Participants in the “Earthly Paradise” conference in Palo Alto explore the Arizona Garden on the Stanford University campus. Originally designed for the Stanford family by Rudolph Ulrich c. 1881, this Victorian garden was restored by volunteers. Photo © Susan Chamberlin, 2003


Conference
CULTIVATING CAPISTRANO: HISTORIC VALLEY GARDENS AND LANDSCAPES
October 11-13, 2002
Best Western Capistrano Inn
San Juan Capistrano, California
Featuring a workshop on cultural landscape preservation and documentation


Conference
GARDEN HISTORY OF SONOMA COUNTY
September 22-23, 2001
Trinity Episcopal Church
Sonoma, California


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GARDEN HISTORY OF THE MONTEREY PENINSULA
October 7-8, 2000
Casa Munras Garden Hotel
Monterey, California


Conference
ARTISTIC LEGACIES: UNLOCKING THE TREASURES BEHIND THE GARDEN GATES
August 20-23, 1999
Rancho Los Alamitos Historic Ranch and Gardens & Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site
Long Beach, California


cglhs santa barbara casaConference
REGIONAL MEETING:
HISTORY OF SANTA BARBARA GARDENS

February 26, 1999
Santa Barbara Botanic Garden
Santa Barbara, California

Casa del Herrero garden tour in Montecito

Image: Left to Right Front Row: Roberta Burke, Thea Gurns, Marie Barnidge McIntyre; Second Row: Susan Chamberlin, Laurie Hannah, Lucy Warren, Margaret Mori, Mitzi VanSant; Back Row: Pat Chamberlin, Roberta Burke’s husband, Bill Grant, John Blocker, Marlea Graham. Photo courtesy of Bill Grant


Conference
SACRAMENTO AREA EMPHASIS
May 2-4, 1998
State Capitol Building

Sacramento, California


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PASADENA AREA EMPHASIS
October 11-12, 1997
The Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens

San Marino, California


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BAY AREA EMPHASIS
April 12-14, 1997
University of California Faculty Club

Berkeley, California


Conference
BOTANIC HERITAGE GEMS OF SAN DIEGO
November 9-11, 1996
Balboa Park
San Diego, California


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SECOND ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
February 17-19, 1996
Santa Barbara Botanic Garden

Santa Barbara, California
Keynote address by David C. Streatfield on “The History of Gardens and Landscapes in California”


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FIRST ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
September 23, 1995
University of California, Santa Cruz, Arboretum
Santa Cruz, California
Keynote address by William A. (Bill) Grant